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Friedensau Adventist University Partners with Sazava Theological Seminary

Friedensau Adventist University Partners with Sazava Theological Seminary

During its May 12, 2009, board of director's meeting, Friedensau Adventist University (Theologische Hochschule Friedensau) signed an agreement to collaborate with Sazava Theological Seminary in the Czech Republic. With the agreement, Sazava Seminary becom

May 25, 2009 | CD EUD

During its May 12, 2009, board of director's meeting, Friedensau Adventist University (Theologische Hochschule Friedensau) signed an agreement to collaborate with Sazava Theological Seminary in the Czech Republic. With the agreement, Sazava Seminary becomes a sister institution that will operate in close collaboration with Friedensau University. Students from Sazava Theological Seminary will be able to obtain a Bachelor of Art's degree in theology that is fully recognized in the European Union.

Beginning next school year, students from Sazava Seminary will have a choice between enrolling in the Bachelor of Theology program accredited by the Adventist Accreditation Association (AAA) and recognized by other Adventist colleges and universities or enrolling in the Bachelor of Art's program guarantied by Friedensau University and recognized by all universities and colleges in Europe and also accredited by AAA.

As L. Svrcek, director of Sazava Theological Seminary, explained, “The negotiations lasted several years but have been very constructive and friendly. We have had to adjust our academic program and incorporate several subjects such as missiology and hymnology in order to comply with the requirements and standards of Friedensau University.”

The Adventist theological seminary for the Czech and Slovak Republics has a long and eventful history. The first Adventist institution that prepared pastors was organized in former Czechoslovakia in 1920 by a German-American missionary, M. Wentland. Between 1925 and 1934, the Missionary Institute had a large campus in Lodenice near Prague. The Institute prepared Adventist pastors for ministry in many countries. Unfortunately, the institution had to close its doors in 1934 due to the economic depression. However, immediately after the Second World War, the school was reopened on a new premises in Prague and operated until 1950, when it was closed by the communist regime. It reopened in 1968, but the communist authorities closed it again four years later. The Adventist church was only able to begin official theological training after the fall of communism. The existing Theological Seminary opened in 1990 in Prague. Although the seminary has been housed in several different facilities, the institute has enjoyed its own campus in Sazava since 1995.

“Next year our school will commemorate the 90th anniversary of Adventist theological education in the Czech Republic, the 20th anniversary of its full restoration, and the15th anniversary of its existence in Sazava. We hope that for the celebration we will be able to complete several planned projects such as the new library and auditorium building and additional dormitory facilities,” stated Svrcek.

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