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Outreach during the Olympic period, what now?

Outreach during the Olympic period, what now?

London, August 19, 2013. [V.Hubert/BUCnews]. Sixteen days of high energy sports completed. A brief pause before the Paralympics starts. Records broken, volunteers enthused but exhausted, but for a church that has been focused on outreach during the Olympi

August 17, 2012 | Victor Hubert BUC News; Pictures BUCNews

London, August 17, 2013. [V.Hubert/BUCnews]. Sixteen days of high energy sports completed. A brief pause before the Paralympics starts. Records broken, volunteers enthused but exhausted, but for a church that has been focused on outreach during the Olympic period, what now?

For Colin Stewart, Adventist representative in the Christian Consortium, 'Going for Gold', part of the legacy is the spirit of volunteerism. He says, "Many newspapers and athletes have reported nothing but great things from all the volunteers who are welcoming, shadowing and caring for them as they spend their time here in the UK; and amongst them are many of our very own Seventh-day Adventists."

Why do they do it? Colin states, "These volunteers demonstrate the true nature of service, shining God's light in all opportunities in the hope that many of our International guests will leave the UK having met Jesus."



They worked tirelessly in a variety of roles and venues across Great Britain representing London hospitality and also brightly flying the flag of faith as they carried out their shifts. Colin suggests that the games "allowed us to shine in a way that shows something special about the love of Jesus".

Conservative estimates suggest that up to100 Adventist Volunteers got involved in service and many, many, more, were involved with their local churches in serving in their communities across the British Isles.

Lavon Jackson, Games Maker from the Filipino Adventist Fellowship stated that he "wanted to be a part of something that makes a positive difference," adding, "I have learned that service is so important in changing lives and that my time and effort is a free gift I can offer to share my faith."



Sherrille Hyatt, from Edmonton Church adds, "The Games was in my back yard and I know God can use me. I got tremendous satisfaction knowing I was part of something special."

Colin himself volunteered as a Media Transport Member. "Serving is always a great honour and that was my motivating factor for volunteering for the greatest show on earth!" Zoe Ramos, part of the Games Maker Welcome Team at Wembley and Heathrow stated that, "it is and has been my duty and honour to be there to greet the world, and meet fabulous people as they feel welcomed and are welcomed in to GB, and share my smile with each and every one of them I come across. I thank God for chances, opportunities and encounters."

Richard Daly, who volunteered as an Olympic Chaplain, stated in a BUC News Video Interview that he saw himself as more than pastor of just a church. He will not be confined by the walls of a church. He is there to share good news with the world. This is his fourth Olympic experience but the first where he has served full-time as a chaplain.

For Somi Idowu who served during Victory Ceremonies and Medal Presentation and who will continue during the Paralympics, Jason Poddar who volunteered in Medal Ceremonies, Mgcini Mkwananzi who served at Wimbledon, Jay Gittens, Celene Gervais and many more, they believe the Olympic legacy is to prove that volunteerism, an important part of the Adventist lifestyle, is not dead but will spur church members into volunteering even more within their own communities.

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